The Center for Mind-Body Medicine

Childbirth Education: Mind-Body Medicine and the Power of a Well Asked Question

Mind-Body Medicine and the Power of a Well Asked Question

I teach a one-day childbirth preparation course — an odd phenomenon in itself, especially when you think that people will spend a year or two planning a wedding that is a single day’s event versus the birth of your child and the impact that childbirth has on one’s life and all of eternity.

Recently a single woman attended with her boyfriend, the father of their unborn child. She was both unusual and brave, as she openly acknowledged that this was not a “committed” relationship. Yet, here they were, questioning, open, at odds, yet together.
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My Granny’s Turnips

My Grannys Turnips

Everybody hated turnips in boarding school (Alexandra School, Amritsar, India) where we used to get turnips with lamb during winters. Most of the girls slept hungry the night this appetite buster was served for dinner.
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All Will Be Well

All Will Be Well

“All is well, and all shall be well, and all manner of things shall be well.” This phrase has been reassuring for me in times of stress and anxiety for years. The fifteen months between May of 2012 and August of 2013 were months that challenged Julian of Norwich’s words as I lost both parents and my husband. I felt I could barely come up for air from one death, one crisis, until another hit. My friends were concerned for me; I have health problems including multiple sclerosis, and stress can exacerbate the disease.
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Tigers in the Preschool Classroom

Tigers in the Preschool Classroom

Affect dysregulation in young children is a significant problem in preschool classrooms, often leading to preschool expulsion and teacher burnout.

To address this issue, I and the Outreach Counselors at Kamehameha Schools Community Based Early Childhood Education Program — a Hawaiian-based statewide preschool system — developed a training that focuses on helping teachers learn how to self regulate. Learning and practicing “soft belly” helps teachers stay calm while allowing children to “co-regulate” their fragile nervous systems (young children “lean on” the nervous systems of their caregivers).
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