From Mind-Body Medicine

Saybrook

Saybrook University’s School of Mind-Body Medicine Offers Four PhD Specializations in Mind-Body Medicine

By Donald Moss, PhD

In August 2009, James S. Gordon and the Center for Mind-Body Medicine collaborated with Saybrook University, founding the Graduate School of Mind-Body Medicine for individuals pursuing a master’s degree and/or doctoral degree. As the program has grown over the years, the graduate school now provides four doctoral level specializations, to prepare graduates for careers in healthcare and mental healthcare. Influenced by the humanistic philosophy of Saybrook University, the central focus of each degree program and specialization emphasizes person-centered health care, and advocates the importance of integrating self-care, mind-body practices, and other alternative approaches within the mainstream of health and mental healthcare. The School of Mind-Body Medicine is designed as a hybrid program, which affords working professionals the opportunity to conveniently attend a maximum of three short residential conferences a year, as well as complete all of their coursework through online and videoconference technology.

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Childbirth Education: Mind-Body Medicine and the Power of a Well Asked Question

I teach a one-day childbirth preparation course — an odd phenomenon in itself, especially when you think that people will spend a year or two planning a wedding that is a single day’s event versus the birth of your child and the impact that childbirth has on one’s life and all of eternity.

Recently a single woman attended with her boyfriend, the father of their unborn child. She was both unusual and brave, as she openly acknowledged that this was not a “committed” relationship. Yet, here they were, questioning, open, at odds, yet together.

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All Will Be Well

By Carolyn Roberts, PhD

“All is well, and all shall be well, and all manner of things shall be well.” This phrase has been reassuring for me in times of stress and anxiety for years. The fifteen months between May of 2012 and August of 2013 were months that challenged Julian of Norwich’s words as I lost both parents and my husband. I felt I could barely come up for air from one death, one crisis, until another hit. My friends were concerned for me; I have health problems including multiple sclerosis, and stress can exacerbate the disease.

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