On Being, with Krista Tippett

Screen Shot 2015-08-31 at 10.54.27 amCMBM Director of Program Development Dan Sterenchuk shares his favorite podcasts from Krista Tippett’s program “On Being” – you can listen and download for free using these links below:


October 9th: Transforming Medicine

An event for thought leaders and change agents interested in the future of medicine

Mark your calendar to join On Being’s Krista Tippett—a Peabody Award-winning broadcaster and a New York Times bestselling author—for a conversation with three visionaries on the front lines of change in medicine:

  • Mark Hyman, a family physician, director of the Cleveland Clinic Center for Functional Medicine, and founder and medical director of The UltraWellness Center
  • James S. Gordon, a psychiatrist, the founder and director of The Center for Mind-Body Medicine, and a clinical professor in the departments of Psychiatry and Family Medicine at Georgetown Medical School
  • Penny George, a visionary leader in the national movement to transform medicine and health care through the principles and practices of integrative medicine, and co-founder of the Penny George™ Institute for Health and Healing—the largest hospital-based integrative medicine program in the country

Friday, Oct. 9at Best Buy Auditorium in the Northrop on the University of Minnesota Campus in Minneapolis

5:30–6 p.m. – Registration
6–7:30 p.m. – Panel Discussion led by Krista Tippett
7:30–9 p.m. – VIP reception (special registration required)

Space is limited.

PRESENTED BY:

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In partnership withCleveland Clinic Center for Functional Medicine & The Center for Mind-Body Medicine

Pricing

  • $19 – General registration for panel discussion only
  • $14 – Registration for Mind Body Medicine Fundamentals Conference attendees – panel discussion only
  • $249 – VIP registration (VIP reception, VIP seating in the front rows) ($200 is Charitable Gift Contribution)

To learn more, contact: Laurie Hennen, 612-775-2590

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FAM Faculty Features: Aviva & Stefanie

I love my FAMily! Food As Medicine faculty features

Join the country’s leading lifestyle medicine clinicians and researchers as well as some of our most gifted holistic nutritionists, mind-body practitioners, patient advocates, and chefs, for the Food As Medicine Professional Training Program


 

Aviva RommAviva Romm, MD – Dr. Romm is a family physician, midwife, herbalist, and internationally respected expert in botanical and integrative medicine for women and children. She has spent nearly 30 years as a health care practitioner and advocate for the health and environmental concerns of women and kids.

Screen Shot 2015-08-28 at 11.12.12 amAviva is an award-winning author and creator/owner of online courses on the vitality and optimal health of women and children: WomanWise and Healthiest Kids University. Aviva also has ebooks for download (such as this ebook on herbal medicine for kids), an informative and interactive Facebook, several videos, and is the author of 7 books on natural medicine for women and children including Botanical Medicine for Women’s Health, The Natural Pregnancy Book, Naturally Healthy Babies and Children, Natural Health After Birth,Vaccinations: A Thoughtful Parent’s Guide, ADHD Alternatives (with her husband Tracy Romm Ed.D.), and The Pocket Guide to Midwifery Care.

Aviva will be discussing Women’s Health & Prenatal Care, and Phytomedicines at Food As Medicine.

 

Stefanie Sacks

Stefanie Sacks, MS, CNS, CDN Stefanie is a Culinary Nutritionist who has been studying food and healing for 25 years, and has a Masters of Science in nutrition from Columbia University. She helps individuals and groups transition to healthier eating by working with them hands-on.

What+the+Fork+Are+You+Eating-+An+Action+Plan+for+Your+Pantry+and+Plate+-+Stefanie+SacksCheck out her book What the Fork Are You Eating? An Action Plan for Your Pantry and Platewhich contains an overview of the truth about what’s hidden in your food plus an action plan with 50 time-tested, delicious recipes.

On her radio show and podcast Stirring the Pot Stefanie brings together the best minds in food, cooking, nutrition and health to discuss some of the hottest topics from food and agriculture policy to edible sourcing, dietary needs and cooking. Each week Stefanie offers answers to burning questions, shares a good brand, a weekly yum recipe and a rock solid guest to inform and inspire listeners.

At FAM, she will be teaching cooking classes during lunch and will be available to answer cooking/nutrition questions.

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Go With the Flow

Screen Shot 2015-08-28 at 10.50.03 amAn interview with Mind-Body Medicine faculty member Carol Penn on her QiGong practice. Carol recently hosted a 4-part QiGong series “Go With the Flow” in Philadelphia! 

 

Carol Penn QiGong1

How did you find QiGong practice, and how does it make you feel? Who has supported you as you have learned?

I found QiGong practice, initially through the influence of my Mom who thought that I was well suited to a practice like Tai Chi and QiGong. She found the slow fluid movements beautiful and thought they complimented my natural movement style. So my mom first planted the seeds actually decades before I began the practice. When I did begin, my father and I decided to study together after I had foot surgery and was non weight bearing and my father had been living with 4 different primary cancers for about 15 years. We had a sense that the end of his life was close at hand. Always active together, this was to be our last father daughter dance!

What kinds of questions do people usually ask you about QiGong? What piques their interest the most?

The most common question is: What is QiGong? Often I ask the person if they have ever heard of Tai Chi – the vast majority are familiar with Tai Chi. I then respond by explaining what the words ‘qi’ and ‘gong’ mean.

What challenges have you faced in your practice, and how have you handled them?

Sometimes for me the biggest challenge I face is the overwhelming emotion I feel when talking about my practice with others. Often, there are tears just behind my words as my practice is a living monument of my love and relationship with my parents, especially my father, who did die in the spring of the year that we began studying QiGong together. His presence is instantly all around me every time I practice and every time I teach my QiGong flow “Let it Be”.

How do you see your QiGong practice fitting in with other elements of your life?

My primary language has always been movement. While QiGong has its origins in another culture, I do believe that this is the movement that I will be studying and doing when I am 90, the movement of both my now and my future. I think the essence of QiGong is universal and transcends both spoken language and culture, politics, race, and gender. I think both the art and science of QiGong will prove to be a mind-body skill and practice that has the potential to change the human tendency to default to the negative.

Carol Penn QiGong 2

Has your practice taught you anything new about integrative medicine, nutrition, or health?

Yes, QiGong, like dance, is a transformative practice. At the end of practice, you are never the same as when you begin. One of the things I always loved about dance performance was noticing as an audience member, how watching the dancers changed you as an observer. An aspect of QiGong is that one can channel and transmit Qi, purposefully to others for their healing and well being, even while we continue to heal ourselves. The other aspect that is so valuable is the balancing of the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems and that allows all body systems to optimize their functions.

What would you advise someone who is timid about getting started?

There are many different forms of QiGong. I would advise anyone to begin exploring, take a fewCarol Penn QiGong classes, and try a few forms until you find a practice that is suitable for you. There are a few good DVDs available as well as information online.

Do you have a favorite movement or time of day or place to practice?

My favorite movement currently is one called ‘watching clouds.’ My favorite time to practice is anytime, day or evening!

What has practicing QiGong taught you about who you are as a person and how you relate to the world?

For me, my practice is a safe haven. Moving has always been when I feel closest to Spirit, to Life, to Love, to God; my highest and best self. My QiGong practice has deepened this lifelong awareness within me.

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