The Center for Mind-Body Medicine

Breathe Peace

Breathe Peace

Today we live in a fast-paced world, inundated by an abundance of activity and general craziness. This mantra meditation reminds us to breathe some peace into our lives. Beautifully narrated by The Center for Mind-Body Medicine’s Clinical Director, Amy Shinal, this 4 minute audio walks you through a deep-breathing exercise using the words “breathe” and “peace” spoken quietly to yourself. Take a moment and quiet the noise of demands, stress, sadness, or whatever else is weighing on your mind. A great mantra to maintain throughout the holiday season and always. We could all use a little more peace in this world – Wouldn’t you agree?

Bye Bye Butterflies

Bye-Bye Butterflies cover

Would you like to help the special children in your life cope with worry and anxiety?

We’re thrilled to announce the publication of Bye-Bye Butterflies: Seven Ways To Breathe Out Worry, written by our Mind-Body Medicine faculty member Lilita Matison, LCSW. As a K-5 children’s counselor for 5 years, Lilita became familiar with the children’s worries and creative about helping them mindfully cope. This book is a marvelous result. Publicity for the book describes it as teaching “self-regulation, stress management and mind-body techniques”, and it certainly does; but it’s really just the cutest, most empowering and practical gift you could give any young child.

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Journey of the Breath

Journey of the Breath

Join Mind-Body Medicine faculty member Kathy Farah, MD, a family doc from western Wisconsin, in this very brief guided visualization in which we appreciate our breath in a different way, as it travels deep into our lungs, giving us oxygen at a cellular level. Wonderful. Love her voice! Editor

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What’s for Breakfast? In the Kitchen with Mark Hyman

In the Kitchen with Mark Hyman

Unless you’ve been asleep for a decade, you know Food As Medicine faculty member and CMBM Board Member Mark Hyman, MD, is on a crusade to revolutionize American health. In his latest book, The Blood Sugar Solution Cookbook, he makes it easy to satisfy our dual desire for healthy AND flavorful food using simple approaches that work for even the busiest people. Join him in the kitchen as he shows us how quickly you can prepare a delicious power-packed protein shake for a busy day — and one for your mom, too. (Awwww — so sweet, Mark!).

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Equal Opportunity Group Experience

MBS_Adult_Group_Nutrition_and_Mindful_Eating

Since my first Mind-Body Medicine Professional Training Program in 2006, there have been so many moments in which I have given quiet thanks for all that I have learned and experienced with the Center. The moment captured in this photo is but one of many. Having facilitated mind-body skills groups in all kinds of places with all kinds of people, young and old, I have noticed so many common themes, including one I’ve heard Jim refer to as the “equal opportunity group experience.”

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Yoga for All: a Little Can Be Lots

Yoga for All

Yoga is NOT just for people with beautiful bodies or those that have flexible bodies. Yoga offers tools that can be adapted to your unique needs. Are you stiff? Have joint problems? Pain? Overweight?

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Clear Intentions

When did you begin meditating and why?

Which meditation practice(s) did you choose?

How has meditation affected your life?

I began meditating in 1974 right after medical school.

I was a psychology major in college and deeply influenced by Albert Schweitzer, who had doctorates in music and theology when he went to medical school as a path to lifelong service in Africa.

So, with this mind-body-spirit perspective, I was thrilled to read two groundbreaking articles that Herbert Benson and Keith Wallace published when I was in medical school. In both studies, practitioners of Transcendental Meditation (TM), silently repeating their word (‘mantra’), demonstrated physiological changes of deep rest while awake. Those changes were often even greater than those found during sleep. Benson called these changes the Relaxation Response, which has formed the basis for his work ever since.

Not long afterwards, I discovered that one of the pathology faculty members was meditating behind his closed door for 20 minutes each afternoon. He referred me to his TM teacher and I learned to meditate.
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The Doctor Inside the Patient: Mind-Body Medicine in Ecuador

Maria and her children waited in line with 400 others for our clinic gate to open at 8 AM. Our 5 doctors and 2 nurses were each waiting with their interpreter at 7 little tables in the one room church.

Maria was quiet and looked very sad. Her unhappy marriage was causing serious sleep problems. Medication made her feel bad and didn’t help. Her 7-year old daughter had warts on her hands and her 4-year old son was grinding his teeth during sleep.

This was my first mission trip. I had been told that our main service would be touching and loving our patients since our medication supply was insufficient to meet the needs of the people in this impoverished community. Stress-related conditions are common among these farm workers raising bananas, cocoa and other tropical foods. Maria and her children had symptoms often associated with stress.

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Self Care Reminders from the Third Grade

Around two weeks before the start of any school vacation, the Counseling office experiences a cyclical peak of drop-in students. An influx of mostly third graders appear at my door with tears streaming down their cheeks, runny noses, and words that are difficult to decipher between hiccup-like breaths and broken syllables.  They are usually accompanied by a friend who guarantees their safe passage to my office then departs, with the I’ve-been-there-too look and a silent nod saying it’s going to be okay.

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Finding the Light in the Darkness

Yesterday, I had an incredibly powerful yoga class. I spent the entire class practically wtih my eyes closed. It wasn’t intentional at first but then had great meaning for me. We started with a little flow and then stopped with eyes closed to “set an intention” as my teacher says. I closed my eyes and had some tears come out. I decided on this early early morning (I do yoga at 6 AM), I was going to search inward for the light, for the joy. That I could not attach to finding that in the stressful situations before me. That no matter how Zubin does on the steroids or if and when he deteriorates to a wheelchair, that no matter how he does in school or if we feel we get what we need there, that joy is not something I can wait for from these things. I have to search inward and get joy from within. And so I closed my eyes and set my intention, to search for the light and peace within.

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