The Center for Mind-Body Medicine

Veterans Health Administration Uses Food As Medicine In Their Local Community

Veterans Health Administration Uses Food As Medicine In Their Local Community

After attending The Institute for Functional Medicine (IFM) several times and Food As Medicine (FAM) this past summer*, I continue to find the information to be brilliant. I purchased the FAM DVD and audio cassettes to share with our VA staff. Recently, our nutrition service received a grant to expand our weight management nutrition and exercise program into the local community.
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Tigers in the Preschool Classroom

Tigers in the Preschool Classroom

Affect dysregulation in young children is a significant problem in preschool classrooms, often leading to preschool expulsion and teacher burnout.

To address this issue, I and the Outreach Counselors at Kamehameha Schools Community Based Early Childhood Education Program — a Hawaiian-based statewide preschool system — developed a training that focuses on helping teachers learn how to self regulate. Learning and practicing “soft belly” helps teachers stay calm while allowing children to “co-regulate” their fragile nervous systems (young children “lean on” the nervous systems of their caregivers).
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Koru: A Program to Help Students with Stress at Duke University

Koru - A Program to Help Students with Stress at Duke University

“I don’t think I would have made it through grad school without this class.”

This is a quotation from a Duke student who participated in Koru, a course to help students with stress that has its inspiration in mindfulness meditation and The Center for Mind-Body Medicine’s mind-body skills group model.

Koru, which is a Maori symbol for growth around a stable center, began at Duke University in 2007 and has since then transformed the lives of hundreds of Duke students.
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TechnoStress in the Sauna

TechnoStress in the Sauna - Kathie Madonna Swift

The other day after my workout, I headed to the sauna to savor some quiet time to detox and unwind. Shortly after I got settled in to my warm cocoon and a meditative state, another woman came in to do the same, or so I thought. Wrapped in her terry cloth robe, she immediately reached into her pocket, pulled out her smartphone and began texting away.

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Fear or Trust. You Choose.

Many things have happened lately to make me fearful of others and of life itself. My world seems to be filled with people who hold unfounded grudges that baffle me and choose to say vindictive things for no other reason than spite. We’ve had deaths and serious illnesses, difficult medical prognoses. Family members whose actions are more about greed than family values. Job losses and insecurity. It’s been difficult to hold on to the trust and acceptance that got me through past challenges. I see fear peeking out of every corner, tugging at me, knocking on the door, enticing me to believe that the world is full of anger, resentment, greed and struggles. Fear is ready to haunt me, settle into my stomach and my bones. In fact, I can already feel it in my body, aching and throbbing.

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Shame

Shame - blog post

Shame is an inevitable component of binge eating disorder, so although it’s the most common of eating disorders, it’s rarely discussed.

Binging was a carefully hidden secret for me since my early teen years. I remember getting upset over a running injury and devouring a chocolate cake. Not a piece of cake — a whole chocolate cake — and it was still mostly frozen. Binging was my normal; I didn’t believe change was possible. So even as I got degrees in nutrition and ate more nourishing foods, there were still nights where I’d polish off a can of frosting, and suffer through the inevitable self-loathing hangover.

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Bringing Mindfulness to Medicine

Bringing Mindfulness to Medicine

I learned to meditate over 20 years ago. It opened the doors to a lifelong practice of meditation techniques, including Vipassana and yoga, and spiritual exploration with wonderful teachers. As I practiced and practiced, I noticed that I was able to listen more deeply to both my patients and myself, and felt less stressed in my daily work as a medical doctor.

It wasn’t until 15 years ago when I began to work with The Center for Mind-Body Medicine that I learned the importance of teaching my patients these skills, too. Stress is a contributing factor for 80% of all chronic illness in our country, and numerous studies have shown the power of meditation and mind-body skills to reduce the effects of stress and even reverse illness. I talk at length about this in my book, The Immune System Recovery Plan, A Doctors 4-Step Program for Treating Autoimmune Disease. At Blum Center for Health we teach these skills in Mind-Body Groups, following the model developed by The Center for Mind-Body Medicine.

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Shaking and Dancing with My Gynecologist

Shaking and Dancing with My Gynecologist

On day one of the Mind-Body Medicine Professional Training Program, our first large group modality is shaking and dancing. “Oh no,” I think, “I get to shake this body I usually ignore, in front of 250 people I don’t know. How silly will I look and will released energy make me sick in some way like throwing up or hurting my legs or my replaced hip joints?” A breath of relief comes as Dr. Gordon says we are to close our eyes. What was I thinking anyway? I am in a room of professional health care providers, with a doctor standing right next to me.

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Mindfulness at the Office: Our Secret Efficiency Factor

Mindfulness at the Office

Every meeting at The Center for Mind-Body Medicine starts with a minute or so of Soft Belly Meditation, which is deep breathing with the simple mantra, “soft….belly”.

Most interns and guests look a little wide-eyed at the first meeting here when the meditation is announced. Perhaps they’re thinking “What have I gotten myself into?” or “Who are these people?!” I know I did, when I started working here. But after attending meetings at other companies and meetups, where you launch into business without the benefit of a meditation, I definitely notice a difference.

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Soft Belly Breathing

Soft Belly Breathing - blog post

Our signature mind-body medicine technique is something Founder and Director James Gordon, MD calls “Soft Belly”, by way of encouraging each of us to relax — which few of us instinctively do these days.

We sit quietly, breathing in through our nose and out through our mouth, which both calms the sympathetic nervous system and awakens the parasympathetic nervous system, creating a feeling of relaxation in the mind and body. Dr. Gordon suggests we think “soft” as we breathe in and “belly” as we breathe out, reminding ourselves to relax our belly so we can take in full, healing breaths rather than shallow, tense ones.

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