The Center for Mind-Body Medicine

Coping in the Courtroom — and in Life

Coping in the Courtroom -- and in Life

I assisted a young girl who was sex trafficked and helped her to overcome barriers with testifying in criminal court against her predators and they received maximum sentences as a direct result of my training through The Center for Mind-Body Medicine.
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Tools for Packing Away the Pain

Tools for Packing Away the Pain

Several years ago, the Universe forced me to examine the “scar tissue” surrounding my heart, the direct result of a chronic American illness– racism. The multiple re-injuries to this wound affected every aspect of my existence, from family interactions, to childhood friendships, to personal and professional goals. Tragically, it also affected my own self-image.
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Peace on Earth

Peach on Earth

Sometimes we talk about how the Center’s work at a very broad level is really peace and conflict resolution work: healing trauma in individuals, families and communities, to bring about forgiveness, revitalization, growth, and hope. Perhaps, if you are an alum of our programs, you have experienced this?

Sometimes healing means understanding, sometimes it means letting go. It might mean leaving, or staying; it might mean developing gratitude, awareness, self-compassion, or self-expression. Mind-body medicine allows us to be human, and our group model creates the holding container in which what needs to happen can finally happen, instead of being held in or held back. Again and again, we witness the beauty and resilience of the human spirit.

In the season of light, as the new year approaches, we look forward to continuing this remarkable healing work, bringing comfort to people who are suffering, and doing our part to bring peace on earth.

Sending love and our very best wishes to you and yours!

The Staff of The Center for Mind-Body Medicine

Author: Jo Cooper, Online Communications Editor

Soft Belly Breathing

Soft Belly Breathing - blog post

Our signature mind-body medicine technique is something Founder and Director James Gordon, MD calls “Soft Belly”, by way of encouraging each of us to relax — which few of us instinctively do these days.

We sit quietly, breathing in through our nose and out through our mouth, which both calms the sympathetic nervous system and awakens the parasympathetic nervous system, creating a feeling of relaxation in the mind and body. Dr. Gordon suggests we think “soft” as we breathe in and “belly” as we breathe out, reminding ourselves to relax our belly so we can take in full, healing breaths rather than shallow, tense ones.

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Creating a Safe Place for Teenage Tibetan Refugees

Dharamsala - auditorium

Recently, I was in Dharamsala, India, for a conference at the Tibetan Medical College sponsored by the Dalai Lama. While there, I had the opportunity to do a workshop for 200 teenage refugees who had just fled Tibet. I taught soft belly breathing, talked about fight or flight and stress responses, did shaking and dancing, and answered questions. The kids were, even in the large group, remarkably open about their difficulty sleeping and studying, the painful memories of loss, and their flight from Tibet. Afterward, the Tibetan physician Dr. Sonam Dolma, who headed up the conference, asked if there were any kids who wanted individual consultations with me. To her and my amazement 20 lined up; others, a bit discouraged by the length of the line, waited for me later.

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Being Present with One Another: Honoring Elderly Veterans

Being Present with One Another: Honoring Elderly Veterans In the beginning, I was cautioned that most elderly veterans would be too debilitated, distressed, or lack the focus and cognitive ability to participate in a group program using CMBM techniques. It has been my experience, however, that CMBM groups are very effective in addressing the primary issues that elderly group members present with, including physical pain, grief, and sensory and cognitive limitations. Continue reading →

What if Your Life Depended on It?

“After Katrina hit I received mops and a bucket from a disaster relief organization. From The Center for Mind-Body Medicine, I got my life back.”
Mindy Milam, LCSW, New Orleans

Most relief organizations focus on the physical: providing supplies, water, shelter, food and medical assistance — and rightly so. But where there is physical trauma — whether it affects our body or our possessions — there is also emotional distress. And with emotional distress, especially in extreme situations, if you can’t cope, nothing else matters. Relieving emotional stress is the key. By lowering levels of stress, we can think more clearly — vital in a crisis — and we can relax our bodies, to express caring and give and receive love more fully.

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Equal Opportunity Group Experience

MBS_Adult_Group_Nutrition_and_Mindful_Eating

Since my first Mind-Body Medicine Professional Training Program in 2006, there have been so many moments in which I have given quiet thanks for all that I have learned and experienced with the Center. The moment captured in this photo is but one of many. Having facilitated mind-body skills groups in all kinds of places with all kinds of people, young and old, I have noticed so many common themes, including one I’ve heard Jim refer to as the “equal opportunity group experience.”

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Newtown: Thick with Grief, Full of Spirit– and Even Joy

monarch butterfly

In the bucolic community of Sandy Hook, the air hangs thick with grief and anxiety. I visited with Dr. James Gordon at the end of July, as CMBM’s new Global Trauma Relief Coordinator, seeing and talking to people who had been profoundly affected by the December 14th shootings at their elementary school. I had followed these events from afar, of course, but now I was actually listening to how people’s lives had changed, and realized that it’s not just the people who lost family and friends who are suffering. Everyone in the Newtown area, perhaps across the state, now sees life differently. Some heard the gunshots. Some saw children flee—and didn’t know why. Some saw the dead, and painfully realized they couldn’t restore life. Tragedy has visited others since then, but in the shadow of December 14, they grapple with it quietly. And how to celebrate? Babies are born; there are birthdays. I worried about being seen as an interloper.

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A Long Way to Go

DSC_JimatOrphanage2 (880x1024)

The next day, before we leave, we spend time at the Foyer des Orphelins d’Haiti,  an orphanage not far from the airport. The cramped gray-walled quarters, beds without mattresses, and, especially, the kids’ desperate need for attention and touch and anything else we might give, bring us all to tears or to that state in which we knew if we would but let them, they would come. There are 70 kids who live in the orphanage and 100 more who go to school there each day. Already, the principal tells us, 60% of the older kids who have participated in our groups, are calmer, more focused. We will, over the next few months, have 10-week-long small groups for all 170, and do whatever we can to help the orphanage’s caring, committed, and overwhelmed staff provide enough food and guidance so that these kids will have the best possible chance at life.

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